Celebrating 5 years of Pinoymiler

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On November 27, 2014, Pinoymiler’s blog will celebrate its 5 years of existence.  And there’s no better way of celebrating it by giving back to its followers and readers.  We will give away Pinoymiler tshirts, standby for the design of the shirt, as well as the mechanics and details on how to win it.

The blogsite is undergoing some aesthetic improvements, for better and easier reading and browsing.

Pinoymiler will also be more active in posting local videos of upcoming collegiate meets.  These videos will be uploaded in the Pinoymiler Channel in Youtube and will be connected to this blog as well.

The Pinoymiler Tweeter account will also be used more. The whole month of November, we will post daily thru the tweeter, the 30 most memorable pictures that this blog has taken from 2009 to 2014.

Watch out for articles featuring college teams, upcoming athletes and established stars.

With deep gratitude, many thanks to all the readers who supported the blog.

Enjoy the month of November!

 

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Remembering Seoul

Closing ceremonies of the 1988 Seoul Olympics:  Eric Buhain on my top, and wrestler Benjamin McMorie on my left

Closing ceremonies of the 1988 Seoul Olympics: swimmer Eric Buhain on my top, and Benjamin McMurray of Judo on my left

Isa sa pinaka masaya at memorable na competitions na sinalihan ko – ang 1988 Seoul Olympics.   Dahil ito ang pinaka peak ko.  Dito ko na set ang Philippine National Record nung semi-finals ng steeplechase na 8:35.09.

Sa Olympic Village kami nag stay at ang roommate ko noon ay si Coach Claro Pellosis.

Pinoymiler’s notes:
Hector Begeo was the last Filipino Track and Field athlete to qualify for the semi-finals in the Olympics.  He clocked 8:46.60 in heat 1 of the qualifying heats to place 8th among 11 entries.  In the semifinals, 12th of 12 but set the still standing Philippine record at the 3,000m steeplechase.
 
Eric Buhain was appointed as Chairman of the Philippine Sports Commission in 2001.  In 2005, he was appointed as the chairman of the Games and Amusements Board. 
 
Benjamin McMurray placed 9th at the heavyweight division of the Judo competitions.
 

Photocredit: Hector Begeo

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RIP Mbulaeni Mulaudzi

Abubaker Kaki of Sudan and Mbulaeni Mulaudzi of South Africa compete in the men's 800m at the 2009 World Championships at Berlin.

Abubaker Kaki of Sudan and Mbulaeni Mulaudzi of South Africa compete in the men’s 800m at the 2009 World Championships at Berlin. (Photocredit: Andy Lyons/Getty Images)

A half miler world champion from South Africa met an untimely death last October 25.

Mbulaeni Mulaudzi, South Africa’s most successful 800m athlete of all time, succumbed to injuries sustained in a car crash near Johannesburg.

Mulaudzi, who was only 34 years old, was the 2009 World Champion at the 800m and the 2004 world indoor champion over the same distance.  He was also the 2004 Olympic silver medalist behind Russian Yuriy Borzakoveskiy peeping Wilson Kipketer at the line and  relegate him to bronze and the 2002 Commonwealth Games gold medalist.

He was the national record holder at 1,000m with 2:15.86   and holds the 2nd fastest South African 800m with a 1:42.86

He was 9 time South African national champion at the 800m (2001-2003, 2005-2009, 2012), and has run sub 1:45 for 10 consecutive years (2001-2010).  And has PBs of 46.3 at the 400m and 3:38.55 at the 1,500m.

He retired from competitions in 2013.

RIP world champion.

 

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Where to go?

patfa_logo

Barely three months into his post, PATAFA president Phillip Ella Juico watched helplessly at the stands as the Philippine Athletics contingent failed to win a single medal in the recent Incheon Asian Games.

But this disappointing performance is not attributable to his leadership. This performance is still attributable to the former president, Go Teng Kok (GTK).

In the same context, that the last Asiad medal in the 1994 Hiroshima Games brought home by Elma Muros Posadas was not attributable to GTK.  As that was the fruit of labor of the  Jose Sering who served as PATAFA head from 1986 to 1991.

After another debacle, the question now is where to go from here?

I can think of three questions which President Juico should take into consideration as he map out his strategy:

a. What are the  plans of PATAFA to improve on its performances and be a contender at the Asian continental level and at the world level.

b. How to support and develop the few identified athletes who can make it to the world stage.

c. What to reform in the system.

Lafferty discusses his program to the media as Juico and GTK looks on at the back during the turnover of PATAFA Presidency (Photocredit: Manila Standard Today)

Lafferty discusses his program to the media as Juico and GTK looks on at the back during the turnover of PATAFA Presidency (Photocredit: Manila Standard Today/EY Acasio)

It is quite satisfying that PATAFA has allied themselves with British American Tobacco CEO Jim Lafferty on the development of athletics. What’s great about this partnership are:

  1. Both Juico and Lafferty are exposed to the corporate world and will not settle for a regional supremacy. That’s what’s wrong with GTK, his aim was always to win medals at the SEA Games. What we need is to aim for respectability at the Asian and global stage;
  2. Lafferty’s influence will dilute the internal politics inside PATAFA. This will open doors for reforms to come in in the organization and attract coaches and athletes with the right attitude. This will eventually professionalize the coaches ranks and install an evaluation system that are long overdue;
  3. Laffety has long been conscious of the athlete’s  food and nutrition.  This will really force PATAFA to evaluate and monitor the athlete’s food intake;
  4. This partnership will attract more private corporate funding for PATAFA. For a long time, businessmen and corporations snubbed PATAFA sponsorships because of the shady personalities surrounding the organization. But with PATAFA’s association with Lafferty, the NSA has now slowly winning the trust and confidence of the business world due to Lafferty’s credibility.

This early into the partnership, Jim Lafferty already came up with the Adopt an Olympian program. This is very similar to the Public and Private Partnership (PPP) strategy of the Aquino administration in its infrastructure upgrade.  I believe that this is the right way to goCongress should also take a look into passing a law which will give additional tax breather to corporations who will support individual athletes or a team in preparation for the Olympics and/or World Championship.

Congressman Yeng Guiao

Congressman Yeng Guiao (Photocredit: Manila Bulletin)

Last week, one of the sports headlines was Congressman Yeng Guiao is proposing a P1B budget for the PSC annual funding.  While I tip my hat off to the Honorable Congressman, P1B is really not enough for all the NSAs of the country.  Not to mention the sustainability of the funding.  What is needed is a PPP in the sports.  Just like what businessman Manny Pangilinan is doing with Samahang Basketball ng Pilipinas (SBP).

For Marestella Torres,  Jesson Ramil Cid and other athletes who will be included in the Adopt an Olympian program,  I suggest that PATAFA hire specialized coaches to hone their skills and prepare them mentally as well.  At first, the coaches can be foreigners as we really don’t have the technical know hows in the jumps and throws. What is important is to have a transfer of knowledge to the athletes being coached.

Jesson Cid formally adopted by Wong Chu King Foundation last August.  Also in the inset are: PATAFA President Philip Juico, Mr Lafferty, Coach Sean Guevarra

Jesson Cid formally adopted by Wong Chu King Foundation last August. Also in the inset are: PATAFA President Philip Juico, Mr Lafferty, Coach Sean Guevarra

With Lafferty’s entry in the PATAFA picture, I firmly believe that the Philippines will witness a renaissance in Athletics. We will not feel the effects of this reforms in the next two years, but starting 2017, you can bet that the Philippines will be relevant again in the Asian Continental level, and the global stage by 2020.

 

 

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PH at Asiad: An Athletics assessment – Part 3 of 3

6. Eric Shauwn Cray

 

Eric was the brightest among the Athletics Team at Incheon.  He set a new National Mark for the 400m hurdles with a scintillating 50.0s performance in his heat.  During the early stages of the Games, the Philippine Team members were one by one, got eliminated due to either below par performances or high-caliber competitions.  But after his heat, we believed once again that we can finally end our 20 year medal drought at the Asian Games.

Eric Cray (399) during the 400m hurdles finals at the 2014 Asian Games where he settled for 6th place.  (Photocredit: Suhaimi Abdullah / Getty Images)

Eric Cray (399) during the 400m hurdles finals at the 2014 Asian Games where he settled for 6th place. (Photocredit: Suhaimi Abdullah / Getty Images)

To the uninitiated, Cray ran a difficult race as he was assigned in  lane 7. Orthodox hurdlers who use only their right leg as lead will be at a disadvantage because they will tend to hug the outside line of their lane as a natural effect of their speed and force.  Plus they need to do some balancing act as they have to mind not to step outside of their lane (to lane 8) because they can get disqualified for obstruction.  The result of course is a slower clocking.

But blessed with legs that can alternately do leads in the hurdles, he was able to negate that difficulty by using his left leg as lead.   The effect of which was a fast race because he can lean in the inside the his lane.  Cray even maintained the lead until the last 50 meters of the race as he let Cheng Wen passed by him.

Below is the video of his national record:

However, during the finals the following day, Cray went too fast during the first half of the race.  Cray ran in the 6th lane during the finals.  He went too fast that he drew with bronze medalist Wen Cheng of China (lane 7) after 100m, and gold medalist Khamis Abbas Ali (lane 8) at the 200m mark.  I would love to dissect the video to get his splits per hurdle and compare it to his 50.00 the previous day, and to Kevin Young’s world record in the 1992 Olympics, just to prove my theory.  But the Asian Games Channel at YouTube removed that video less than a week after it was posted.

But we cannot blame Eric.  We were immediately spoiled after his stunning 50.0.  His 51.47s in the finals is quite decent.  But  it surely left us wondering what could’ve been if he ran the finals with his usual pacing.

The future looks bright with Cray donning the Philippine tri-colors

The future looks bright with Cray donning the Philippine tri-colors

Eric Cray gave us a flicker of hope for the future of the sports. We’re not just talking about Asian level, we are thinking of the World Championships and the Olympics.  With his talent, he can contend with the best hurdlers in the world.  With what we saw in the finals, a low 48s is attainable, given the right training & nutrition and PATAFA funding.

What’s not known to many is that Cray only trains 3x a week because of his two jobs in the US.   Imagine if Cray will train 6 times in a week.  If there’s someone who needs to be included in the Adopt an Olympian Program, Eric should be first in that list.

7. Jesson Ramil Cid

If you will only view his performances in the 100m an 400m events, you will immediately form a conclusion that Jesson Cid is the man to beat in the Incheon Asian Games Decathlon.  He not only won both events, he blew away the rest of the field.

But reality will pull us back down to earth after the rest of the events were played.  A 6.80m at the long jump, 1.84m at the high jump, 11.48m at the shots.  Slowly, Jesson found his way near the bottom of the rankings after 6 events.

Jesson Cid opened the 2014 Asian Games decathlon competitions witha PB 10.63s in the 100m, which incidentally, made him the fastest Pinoy over said event this 2014 season. (Photocredit: AP)

Jesson Cid opened the 2014 Asian Games decathlon competitions witha PB 10.63s in the 100m, which incidentally, made him the fastest Pinoy over said event this 2014 season. (Photocredit: Assocciated Press)

Worst, Jesson was not able to finish the 10 events of the decathlon due to a knee injury.  He bowed out during the pole vault competitions (7th event) ranked 8th among 10 entries.

It is clear where he needs to improve on: the jumps and the throws, where his performances were stagnant for a couple of years now, and are so way far from his 100/400m performances one would wonder if these performances were done by two different athletesThe question that PATAFA should be asking is that, how do we make Jesson address his areas of opportunities?

Below is his 100m video:

Below is Jesson’s comparative performances during the 2013 SEA Games where he first broke the national record, the 2014 Philippine National Games where he again broke the National Mark, and the 2014 Asian Games:

Events 2013 SEA Games 2014 PNG 2014 Asian Games
100m 10.85 894 10.89 885          10.63 945
LJ 7.03 821 7.05 826          6.80 767
SP 11.54 579 11.71 589          11.48 575
HJ 1.86 679 1.97 776            1.84 661
400m 48.37 891 48.16 901           48.03 908
Day 1 3864 3977 3856
110mH 15.26 818 15.52 788           15.24 821
DT 31.14 487 26.67 399                   0
PV 3.9 590 4.1 645                  0
JT 48.98 574 47.63 554                   0
1500m 4:36.1 705 4:35.9 706                   0
Day 2 3174 3092 821
Total 7038 7069 4677

Jesson’s score after the first 5 events was 3,856 pts, 8 pts behind his 2013 record pace and 121 pts behind his PNG performance.  My estimate for his final score would be in the low 6,900 if he was able to finish all 10 events. A sign of plateauing even if he is peaking at the 2 events.

Why do we insist that he needs to improve?  Because he has the raw talent to be a legitimate medal potential at the world stageHis mark in the 100m and 400m were already world class for a decathlete.  In fact, he can run stride by stride with world’s Top 10 Decathletes right now.  And yes, we still consider him a RAW TALENT because the development of his skills in the other 8 events are virtually unpolished up to this point.

Below is his 400m video:

But his knee injury is troublesome.  He got first injured last May during training.  And it recurred after just 5 months.  I hope PATAFA gets alarmed.  We don’t want to lose another  potential world class athlete who did not realize his full potential due to injury sustained during training (remember Ralph Waldo Soguillon?)

One fallback that he can go to is concentrate on 100m.  His 10.63 seconds during the Asian Games, has made him the fastest sprinter of the Philippines this 2014.  He is officially our best sprinter for 2014.  He can challenge Soguillon’s National Mark of 10.45s for sure if given the proper training and nutrition.

His 48.03 seconds performance in the 400m solidified his No. 3 position behind Bagsit and Alejan for the 2014 toplist .  Which will give us another reason to smile if he will leaves the Decathlon.  Jesson can be a strong 2nd or 3rd leg of the 4x400m team.  Jesson will definitely improve on the 400m if he concentrate on it. Potentially he can run in high 47s next season.  This will make the 4x400m team 3:07-3:08 performance at the SEA games.

PATAFA should consider looking into these scenarios and weigh their options very carefully.  By the looks of it, the knee of Jesson has been damaged due to improper training.  But it can be a blessing in disguise as we can be competitive once again in the 100/200 and make our 4x400m stronger.

Sources: 2014Incheonag.org / Asian Games 2014 Youtube Channel, PInoyheadlines Channel

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Rita Jeptoo rules Chicago, unbeaten in 4 marathons

Rita Jeptoo of Kenya wins defended her Chicago Marathon title.  She is not the back to back title holder of the Boston and Chicago Marathons (Photocredits: Andrew Seligman / AP)

Rita Jeptoo of Kenya wins defended her Chicago Marathon title. She is not the back to back title holder of the Boston and Chicago Marathons (Photocredits: Andrew Seligman / AP)

Rita Jeptoo carried on a Kenyan women champion’s tradition of repeating as winners the following year.

Rita Jeptoo defended her 2013 Chicago title by winning this years edition with a clocking of 2:24:35 yesterday, October 12.  She followed the footsteps of her countrymen  Joyce Chepchumba in 98/99 and Catherine Ndereba in 2000/01.

With the win, Jeptoo keeps her streak alive of four consecutive marathon victories with two Bostons and two Chicagos dating back to 2013.

Ethiopia’s Mare Dibaba finished 2nd in 2:25.37 and Florence Kiplagat of Kenya at third with 2:25:57.

Amy Hastings was the highest ranked American at 5th with 2:27.03 (PB).

Below is the top 10 results of the women’s race:

 

Pos. Name (CTZ) BIB Division Age Time
1 Jeptoo, Rita (KEN) 101 30-34 33 02:24:35
2 Dibaba, Mare (ETH) 103 20-24 24 02:25:37
3 Kiplagat, Florence (KEN) 102 25-29 27 02:25:57
4 Dibaba, Birhane (ETH) 106 20-24 21 02:27:02
5 Hastings, Amy (USA) 107 30-34 30 02:27:03
6 Santucci, Clara (USA) 108 25-29 27 02:32:21
7 Crouch, Sarah (USA) 116 25-29 25 02:32:44
8 Burka, Gelete (ETH) 127 25-29 28 02:34:17
9 White, Melissa (USA) 111 30-34 33 02:34:19
10 Jimison, Lauren (USA) 114 20-24 24 02:34:38

Sources: Lets Run.com, Wikipedia

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Kipchoge wins Chicago Marathon, Bekele 4th

Eliud Kipchoge wins the 2014 Chicago Marathon (Photocredits: AP/Andrew Nelles)

Eliud Kipchoge wins the 2014 Chicago Marathon (Photocredits: AP/Andrew Nelles)

2003 5,000m World Champion Eliud Kipchoge of Kenya won the 2014 Chicago marathon with a 2:04:11 timing.  He led a 1-2-3 Kenyan finish but won a comfortable 17 second lead over Sammy Kitwara.

Pre-race favorite Kenenisa Bekele of Ethiopia checked in at 4th with a clocking of 2:05:51.

Highest ranked American was Bobby Curtis at 9th with a 2:11:20 clocking.

Highest ranked Asian was Koji Kobayashi at 10th with a 2;11:43 clocking.

Highest placed teenager was 18-year-old Ghebreslassie Ghirmay of Eritrea at 6th with a clocking of 2:09.08.

2013 winner Dennis Kimetto skipped the 2014 edition as he earlier participated in the Berlin Marathon where he set a new world record of 2:02.57.

Kipchoge helped Kenya won the Chicago Marathon title for the 13th time in the last 17 years, including 11 of the last 12 editions.

Below is the top 25 rankings of the men’s category:

Rank, Athlete’s Name, (Country), Bib No./Age group/ Age/ 21k split/42k Full time

1 Kipchoge, Eliud (KEN), 2/ 25-29/ 29 /01:02:11 / 02:04:11
2 Kitwara, Sammy (KEN), 6 /25-29/ 27 /01:02:12 / 02:04:28
3 Chumba, Dickson (KEN), 7 /25-29/ 27 / 01:02:12 / 02:04:32
4 Bekele, Kenenisa (ETH), 1 / 30-34 / 32/ 01:02:12 / 02:05:51
5 Koech, Bernard (KEN), 5/ 25-29 / 26 /01:02:12 / 02:08:30
6 Ghebreslassie, Ghirmay (ERI), 51 / 16-19 / 18 / 01:02:11 / 02:09:08
7 Rutto, Lani (KEN), 43 / 25-29 / 25 / 01:02:12 / 02:10:42
8 Korir, Wesley (KEN), 8 / 30-34 / 31 / 01:04:16 / 02:11:09
9 Curtis, Bobby (USA), 17 25-29 29 01:05:30 / 02:11:20
10 Kobayashi, Koji (JPN),  9 / 25-29 / 25 / 01:04:17 /02:11:43
11 Riley, Jake (USA), 35 /25-29 / 25 / 01:06:33 / 02:13:16
12 Proctor, Gabe (USA), 30 / 20-24 /24/ 01:05:32 / 02:13:45
13 Landry, Christo (USA), 23 /25-29 /28 /01:06:05 /02:14:30
14 Young, Tim (USA), 27 / 25-29/ 27 / 01:06:50 / 02:14:40
15 Morgan, Mike (USA), 21 / 30-34 / 34 / 01:06:49 / 02:14:42
16  Okamoto, Naoki (JPN), 16 / 30-34/ 30/ 01:05:48 / 02:15:19
17 Sasaki, Satoru (JPN),10 / 25-29 / 28 / 01:05:17 / 02:15:25
18 Fukuyama, Ryosuke (JPN),12 /30-34 / 34 / 01:05:17 / 02:15:33
19 Leon, Craig (USA), 19 /25-29 / 29 / 01:06:05 / 02:16:00
20 Trujillo, Carlos (USA), 20 / 25-29 / 29 / 01:06:32 / 02:16:49

Sources: Let’s run.com

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PH at Asiad: An Athletics assessment – Part 2 of 3

4. Christopher Ulboc

Christopher Ulboc clears the water hazard during the 2014 Incheon Games (Photocredits: Getty Images)

Christopher Ulboc clears the water hazard during the 2014 Incheon Games (Photocredits: Getty Images)

Right after the starting gun fired off, a skinny figure in red vest quickly darted to the lead of the 3,000m steeplechase finals of the Asian Games. He quickly established a 10m lead over the rest.  Visibly exerting effort to maintain the lead, the rest of the field let him do the chores first, maybe even gauging his strength.  But when the field attacked the water jump for their second lap,  eventual winner Abubaker Ali Kamal of Qatar quickly darted into the front.

Then after just 500m from that point, Christopher Ulboc Jr found himself at the tail of the field.  Kamal even almost lapped him during his final lap, good thing he slowed down in the last 100m.

This kind of race strategy makes you wonder if Ulboc was given  proper pre race instructions or he was just carried away with the euphoria of playing in his first Asiad.

For the Filipino non-athletics fans who watched his race, they might find him courageous to stand up against the Asian giants.  But for experienced runners and track and field aficionados, that kind of strategy was ill-advised.

You can employ that strategy if you are superior in stamina and endurance.  Kenyan John Ngugi did the trick in the 1988 Seoul Olympics 5,000m finals.  He started to break away 1,000m into the race, then maintain a 100m gap until the last lap.  When the rest of the field realized their mistake, its too late as he is too far away.  Ngugi was able to accomplish that because he has the stamina to do fast laps at the middle of the race and endure the pain of the rest of the way.

Below is the video:

Ulboc doesnt have Ngugi’s endurance and staying power.  In fact, among the 11 entries, Ulboc has the slowest personal best (PB) at 9:01.59, his winning time in last 2013 SEA Games.

If what happened was a greenhorn’s mistake, you can just shake your head in disbelief as that happens regularly in high school competitions where first time participants in athletic meets tend to be super anxious at the start of the race.

But at the same time, as a taxpayer, you will feel a bit angry as the fund used to send him to the games just went down the drain.  Clearly at the start of the race, we have no hope of Ulboc winning a medal.  But the least expectations from him is to improve on his PB.

Below is the video of the race:

Ulboc could have finished 7th or 8th if he was able to equal his PB.  6th if he were able to improve on his PB by 2 seconds.  If only he did a pace with the intention of improving on his PB.  He would’ve given the Filipinos a nice gift.

Ulboc need to realize that his 9:01 doesn’t make him the successor of Rene Herrera even though he defeated the latter in last years SEA Games.  Rene Herrera defeated himself during that race by checking in 4th with a “slow” 9:09.14.

Ulboc will just turn 24 yrs old this November and should be lowering his PB for the next 5 years, that is, if he will listen to his coach.

5. Marestella Torres

Marestella Torres fouled in all her 3 attempts during the long jump preliminaries to crash out of the finals.  Photocredits:Pinoyheadline.com

Marestella Torres fouled in all her 3 attempts during the long jump preliminaries to crash out of the finals. Photocredits:Pinoyheadline.com

Right after Marestella fouled all her 3 jumps at the Incheon Games, PATAFA Chief Philip Ella Juico immediately declared to local reporters that anybody can have a bad day at the Games.  But wht the good president needs to know is Marestella’s history as a competitior at the world stage.

Torres almost always come out on top if she knows that she is the strongest in the field.  But almost everytime she faces a strong field (except in the 2009 Asian Athletics Championships),  she has the tendency to crumble in crunch time due to pressure.  A 6.17m performance in the 2008 Olympics, a 6.22m in the 2012 Olympics, a 6.22m in the 2009 Worlds and a 6.31m in the 2011 Worlds, Maybe the expectations of a whole nation is just too much.

I hope that Marestella will not get offended by this write-up.  I am doing this to encourage her and her coaching team to correct her weakness.  Because we want her to succeed.  She owes it to herself.  She has sacrificed a lot to chase her dreams.  But if she wants to realize her full potential, she needs to admit that there’s a problem.  Only then that the problem can get corrected.  She needs to know how to handle pressure and develop her self-confidence.

Nevertheless, I fully believe that Mare will qualify for the 2016 Olympics.  Never mind the SEA Games, it’s a given that she will win again in 2015 and 2017.

 

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PH at Asiad: An Athletics assessment – Part 1 of 3

The Philippine Athletics team failed to win a single medal at the recently concluded Asian Games.  This will effectively extend the country’s medal drought in athletics for another 4 years.  The last time the Philippines won an athletics medal in quadrennial games was in the 1994 Hiroshima Asian Games courtesy of Elma Muros in the long jump.

This is not a surprise though as this blog predicted that none of our athletes, in this particular time, will win any medals.  However, the manner that some athletes have competed were a bit surprising.

Lets review the performances of the athletes:

Anchorman Bagsit receives the baton from Alejan in their golden performance at the 2013 SEA Games. (Photocredits: KJ Rosales)

Anchorman Bagsit receives the baton from Alejan in their golden performance at the 2013 SEA Games. (Photocredits: KJ Rosales)

1. Archand Christian Bagsit and Edgardo Alejan.

Bagsit drew the fastest heat among 4 heats (Heat 2).  The winner in his heat was Abbas Abubakar of Bahrain with 45.61 mark (who eventually won the silver).  He towed 4 other qualifiers in his heat, including Bagsit who set a personal record of 46.88s.  Bagsit, who was assigned at lane 7, actually came out 5th at the beginning of the final straight but worked his way to 4th and edged Mohamed of UAE in the last 10 meters.  See his heat below:

Edgardo Alejan was grouped in heat 4 and registered a mark of 47.29s, the slowest among the 16 qualifers.  The winner in his heat was Arokiarajiv of India who had a mark of 46.41s (who eventually won the bronze).

Both Bagsit and Alejan met our expectations by reaching the semis.  See his heat below:

As we assess the future of the two, Bagsit is just 23 yrs old and should be in his prime for the next 5 years.  Bagsit’s performance though is plateauing the last 2 years.  I hope his training / workouts be given a second look by his coach.  He should be at around 46.5s by now and should challenge 46.0s two years from now.

Alejan, who is just 28 years old, is still in his prime and in theory, should still improve on his PB of 46.96s with the right workouts.  Alejan has the potential to lower his PB to 46.50 by next year.

If the two did not improve us such, PATAFA should look into their training workouts.

Dagmil during the 2010 Asian Games long jump where he placed 6th with a 7.52m jump. (Photocredit: Manila Bulletin)

Dagmil during the 2010 Asian Games long jump where he placed 6th with a 7.52m jump. (Photocredit: Manila Bulletin)

2. Henry Dagmil

Henry’s career has been revived after he reclaimed the SEA Games long jump title last 2013 with a massive leap of 7.80m.  His 2014 best of 7.56m is good enough for the finals.  However, his 3rd and final leap in the preliminaries only gave him 7.43m, short of 4 centimeters of the 8th qualifier Konstantin Safronov of Ukraine.  Henry may have played in his last Asiad but we expect him to play out until the 2017 SEA Games where he has a chance to medal and retire on a high note.

We have expected Henry to qualify for the finals though he may settle at 8th place.  An 11th place finish may not sit well for Henry and us as well.  This is because at the back of our minds, he has the capability to barge into the finals.

Dagmil’s  coach of two years, Arnold Villarube has done wonders for him though.  We will be surprised if Dagmil will not win at least a silver in 2015 and a bronze in the 2017 SEA games.

The quartet of Bagsit, Nierras, Alejan and Junrey Bano clocked 3:11.16 at the 2011 SEA games where they place 2nd.  With them is PSC Chairman Richie Garcia (Photocredit:pinoyathletics)

The quartet of Bagsit, Nierras, Alejan and Junrey Bano clocked 3:11.16 at the 2011 SEA games where they place 2nd. With them is PSC Chairman Richie Garcia (Photocredit:pinoyathletics)

3. Men’s 4x400m relay

The team of Archand Christian Bagsit, Edgardo Alejan, Julius Nierras and Isidro del Prado Jr was a letdown in registering a 3:11.67 mark finishing 6th in their heats of the 4x400m.  Their heat was the slower of the two heats.  Kazakhstan, who placed 3rd had a clocking of 3:09.92, half a second slower than the Philippines’s winning time at the 2013 SEA Games.  Their mark was the slowest Philippine 4x400m team in any major regional meets like the SEA Games, Asian Games and Asian Athletics Championships since the 1980s. Their individual legs are as follows: Bagsit 46.4, Alejan 46.6, Nierras 47.9, del Prado 50.6 (all unofficial and was just handtimed using the video coverage).

We have two concerns over the handling of the team.

First is their performance.  Collectively, they did not progress since their 3:09.32 winning mark at the 2013 SEA Games. Take away del Prado’s 50 second anchor leg this 2014 Asian Games and what you will see is still the same performance from leg 1 to leg 3 of the relay.  What does that tell you as an athlete and a coach?  Something’s wrong with their training.  The athlete’s performances are not progressing.  Individually, they should be progressing though.  Bagsit is just 24 yrs old, Tilo has just  turned 23, Alejan is still in his prime at 28.  Only Nierras is above 30 yrs old at 35 but he should maintain at least 48.0s for his caliber and talent.

Second is the way they were assigned in their legs.  Curiously, the Philippines went from strongest to weakest.  Coaches sometimes do that if the team is so superior to other teams that they can experiment with combinations without sacrificing their team’s goal like winning a medal or qualifying to the next stage.  In our case, we sent a team there not just to gain experience, but at least to give our best and qualify for the finals.  A del Prado-Alejan-Nierras-Bagsit leg assignment might give us a different result and a slot at the finals of the 4x400m.

 Sources: Wikipedia, GBRAthletics

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Asiad Athletics: China dominates

A total of 20 countries won at least one athletics medal at the 2014 Asian Games. China emerged the most dominant country by cornering 40 of the 141 contested medals or a 28% share, 15 of China’s 40 medals were gold.  The Chinese athletics team also took home 14 silvers and 11 bronzes.

Wei Yongli is Asia's fastest woman after winning the 2014 Asian Games 100m titile.  She also achored the Chinese team in their 4x100m gold in a Games record (Photocredits: Chung Sung Jun/Getty Images)

Wei Yongli is Asia’s fastest woman after winning the 2014 Asian Games 100m titile. She also achored the Chinese team in their 4x100m gold in a Games record (Photocredits: Chung Sung Jun/Getty Images)

Bahrain was at far second with a 9-6-1 tally with 15 medals in all.  All of which are courtesy of their African imports.

Qatar was at 3rd with 6-0-3.  Except for 3 medals, all of Qatar’s medals were contributed by their African imports.

Japan had the 2nd most medals with 22.  Their haul was 3-12-7.  Five of those silver medals came from their defeats at the hands of the Africans.

Keisuke Ushiro won the Asian Games Decathlon title in a dramatic fashion by winning the last event in

Keisuke Ushiro won the Asian Games Decathlon in the last event.  He ran the 1500m in 4:43.76, just enough to overtake Leonid Andreev and won by 209 pts. (Photocredits: Getty Images)

India has the 4th most number of medals with 13 with their 2-3-8 tally.

Host South Korea settled for a 0-4-6 medal tally.

Yousef Masrahi of Saudi Arabia set a new Games record over att he 400m dash with a 44.66 mark

Yousef Masrahi of Saudi Arabia set a new Games record over at he 400m dash with a 44.66 mark (Photocredits: Lintao Zhang/Getty Images)

Twelve (12) athletes successfully defended their Asiad titles.  They are Qatar’s Femi Ogunode (mens 200m), Qatar’s Mutaz Barshim (high jump), KSA Sultan Al Hebshi (mens shotput), Iran’s Ehsan Hadadi (discuss throw), Tajikistan’s Dilshod Nazarov (mens hammer throw)  Kazakstan’s Margarita Mashko (womens 800m), Maryam Yusuf Jamal (womens 1,500m), Uzbekistan’s Svetlana Radzivil (women’s high jump), Kazakhstan’s Olga Rypakova (women’s triple jump), China’s Zhang Wenxiu (womens hammer throw), India with their women’s 4x400m China with their men’s 4x400m team.

The Indian women's 4x400m team won their 4th successive Asian Games title with a Games record 3:28.68

The Indian women’s 4x400m team won their 4th successive Asian Games title with a Games record 3:28.68 (Photocredits: PTI)

Three athletes have multiple individual medals led by Qatari Femi Ogunode (100/200), Bahraini Maryam Yusuf Jamal (Woments 1,500m/5,000m) and Qatari Mohamad Al-Garni (Mens 1,500m/5,000m)

Margarita Matsko (1131) on her way in defending her 800m Asian Games title om record fashion.  Tintu Lukka of India (1076) won the silver. Photocredits Getty Images)

Margarita Matsko (1131) on her way in defending her 800m Asian Games title om record fashion. Tintu Lukka of India (1076) won the silver. (Photocredits Getty Images)

A total of 16 Asian Games record were set.   They were accomplished by: Femi Ogunode in the mens 100m and 200m, Saudi Arabia’s Yousef Ahmed Masrahi (400m), Qatar’s Mohamad Al Garni (5,000m), China’s mens 4x100m team, China’s Wang Zhen (mens 20km walk), Japan’s Takayuki Tanii (men’s 50km walk), Qatar’s Mutaz Barshim (mens high jump), Kazakhstan’s Margarita Matsko (800m), Bahrain’s Ruth Jebet (3,000m steeplechase), China’s Li Ling (pole vault), China’s Zhang Wenxiu (hammer throw), China’s Zang Li (women’s javelin throw), China’s women’s 4x100m team and India’s womens 4x400m team.

China's womens 4x100m team reclaimed the title they lost in 2010 in a Games record 42.83s.  This is their 7th Asian Games title in the last 8 Asiad. Photocredits: Getty Images)

China’s womens 4x100m team reclaimed the title they lost in 2010 in a Games record 42.83s. This is their 7th Asian Games title in the last 8 Asiad. (Photocredits: Getty Images)

Only one  Asian continental records were set, courtesy of Femi Ogunode who clocked 9.93s in the mens 100m dash.

Below is the final medal tally for athletics:

 

Rank Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1  China (CHN) 15 14 11 40
2  Bahrain (BRN) 9 6 1 15
3  Qatar (QAT) 6 0 3 9
4  Japan (JPN) 3 12 7 22
5  Kazakhstan (KAZ) 3 1 2 6
6  India (IND) 2 3 8 13
7  Uzbekistan (UZB) 2 0 3 5
8  Saudi Arabia (KSA) 2 1 1 4
9  Iran (IRI) 1 1 0 2
10  Iraq (IRQ) 1 0 1 2
11  Indonesia (INA) 1 0 0 1
11  Tajikistan (TJK) 1 0 0 1
11  United Arab Emirates (UAE) 1 0 0 1
14  South Korea (KOR) 0 4 6 10
15  Vietnam (VIE) 0 2 0 2
16  Chinese Taipei (TPE) 0 1 0 1
17  Hong Kong (HKG) 0 0 1 1
17  Thailand (THA) 0 0 1 1
Total 47 47 47 141

Source: Wikipedia

 

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